Let’s change the world for women — step by step!

Women, second generation biasWatching an episode of ‘Working Moms’ with my daughter recently, reminded me just how difficult it can be for working women, particularly with a new baby, to go back into work and thrive. Yes, we giggled together at the automated breast pumps and the comedy in the script. However, through the humour it brought back memories of being admonished for having baby sick on my suit jacket and being interrogated about my commitment to my career at every juncture.

Sadly in some organisations, I don’t believe much has improved in the last twenty years. So in my last blog for #iwd2019, I want to explore some very simple steps that most organisations can implement straightaway to move gender equality and equity forward. Continue reading


How does mentoring address gender equity for women?

Gender EquityIn the last two decades, many employers have shown enthusiastic commitment to gender diversity. Women have made enormous strides in being able to compete on the same playing field as men at work. This is where initiatives such as mentoring and sponsor programmes have been really successful in helping erode this gender imbalance and create more gender equity. Gender equity means fairness of treatment for women and men, according to their respective needs. All the research strongly confirms this as being an important factor in developing more women leaders. So let us consider:

  1. What are the outcomes from introducing mentoring for women into your organisation?
  2. The outcomes of mentoring which support gender equity for women.
  3. And what is different about female talent mentoring today?

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Does Queen Bee Syndrome make women cruel?

Queen bee syndrome Organisations may face a higher risk of losing female employees who experience female instigated rudeness as they report less satisfaction at work and increased intentions to quit their current jobs in response to these unpleasant experiences. This is according to a new study to be published shortly in the Journal of Applied Psychology by a team led by Allison Gabriel of the University of Arizona.

Queen Bee Syndrome has always been with us, women can be terribly cruel to those underneath them in the hierarchy and pull the ladder up behind them, rather than extend it down to support them in their career progression. If women have had a tough time becoming successful in their career, some women, rather than become the great role model and mentor they could be, feel other junior women coming up behind them are a threat and deciding to either be unpleasant to them or deliberately block their career path.

So how much of an issue is Queen Bee Syndrome in organisations and is it impacting the increase in numbers of women into the Board Room? Continue reading


Webinars for International Women’s Day 2018

International Women's DayAt Coach Mentoring Ltd we are passionate about supporting women in the workplace and helping them not only to survive but thrive through mentoring and coaching solutions.  We specialise in designing and developing support on an individual, programme and organisational level for women. To celebrate International Women’s Day on the 8th March 2018, we are offering three free webinars. These focus on supporting women specifically through mentoring and perhaps some sponsorship too! Continue reading


Use mentoring to claim the tiara you deserve!

Claim your mentoring tiaraTiara Syndrome is a term originally developed by Carol Grohlinger and Deborah Kolb and then used by Sheryl Sandberg in her book ‘Lean in’. Sandberg feels that women often think they can be crowned with the tiara of success by keeping their heads down, working hard, over-preparing and passing all of their exams. Continue reading


Women at work – Are you faking it?

Imposter SyndromeA closer look at Imposter Syndrome

In my final post for International Women’s Day, I am going to consider the issue of Imposter Syndrome. This can have a dramatic impact on a woman’s ambition. It used to be thought of as the domain of the high woman achiever. However, it is a syndrome also experienced by men.

Amy Cuddy in her book ‘Presence’ talks about it being a female rather than a male issue. She says men are far less likely to talk about it. They fear social punishment for failing to conform to social stereotypes, i.e. that men are assertive and confident. Two psychologists Clance and Imes originally termed the condition from their clinical experience. They found it occurs much less frequently in men and when it does occur, it is far less intense. However, more recent research published by the International Journal of Behavioural Science in 2011, shows that 70% of men and women have experienced it at some point in their lives. Millennial’s may suffer from Imposter Syndrome even more. They have commenced their careers at a time of extreme technological pace, where there are constant comparisons on social media between peer group members.

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